How To Pot Indoor Plants Without Drainage Holes | Easy Guide

Indoor plants are easy to grow and maintain. They are known to boost your mood and brighten up your space with greenery. Because of their low maintenance, they are popular and can be in small spaces and cold environments. Doing it right potting of plants requires you have complete knowledge on how to pot indoor plants for them to grow well. 

But sometimes, you can make mistakes with your indoor plant. Over-watering is the most common and easiest way to kill indoor plants. This is because owners overwater their plants and don’t put drainage holes in their plant pots.

A drainage hole keeps water from pooling at the bottom of the plant, maintaining airflow for the roots, keeping the roots from rotting, and ensuring excess water isn’t absorbed by the roots. Except for aquatic plants, most plant roots rot when left in water: a condition called root rot. It leads to withering leaves, yellowing leaves, and leaf drop. 

Another reason for using drainage holes is flushing out excess salts in the soil. The salts in tap water and fertilizers are harmful to plants. The salts are flushed out through the drainage holes when you water your plants regularly.

Although risky for your plant, it’s possible to pot a plant without drainage holes. This guide will help you pot your indoor plants without using drainage holes. 

Preparing Your Plant: How To Pot Indoor Plants Procedure

Before potting your plant, ensure it is healthy. Your space must have access to sunlight, whether you’re using artificial or real plants. Next, you’ll need healthy soil. Lastly, your plant needs a good pot. Most indoor plants come with a plant pot. You won’t need to get one unless it’s too small. 

It’s best to research your plant and its needs. Make sure you use the correct soil type and the right quantity of soil. The proper soil type will help drain water from the roots. 

There are two ways you can pot plants without using drainage holes:

  • Using drainage layers
  • Using a cachepot

Using Drainage Layers

A drainage layer is a layer in your plant’s pot that allows excess water to escape. This layer is usually between the soil and a layer of rocks. These rocks could be drainage rocks or landscape rocks like marble. Drainage rocks include stones like perlite, gravel that is ½ inch-¾ inches big, and granite. Bigger and rougher rocks are better because they don’t settle and block the roots’ airflow, and they move more water than smaller rocks. 

 I will introduce two methods of using drainage layers. 

Method One: Using coffee filters

Preparing Your Plant: How To Pot Indoor Plants Procedure

For this procedure, you will need:

  • A plant pot 
  • Your plant
  • Trowel (optional)
  • Drainage rocks such as marble, perlite, or gravel
  • Soil
  • Coffee filters (use an amount that can comfortably fill the bottom of your pot) 

Step 1:

Arrange the landscape rocks at the bottom of the pot, layering it about 2-3 inches high using the trowel or placing them with your hands.

Step 2:

Add a layer of coffee filters above the rocks. Use as many as you need to cover the rocks. The filters will be temporary as they degrade over time. They will help support the soil and roots.

Step 3:

Using the trowel or your hands, add a layer of soil above the filters. Fill it about halfway or until it reaches near the rim of the pot. The amount you should use depends on the size of your plant.

Step 4:

Knock out your plant from its old pot and gently pry the root tips apart, helping the plant establish its root system.

Step 5:

Firmly place the plant into the pot and layer the remaining spaces with more soil. Push down each layer as you reach the top, making sure the soil is loose enough to let air flow.

READ  Best Ways On How To Grow Lettuce Indoors At Home: DIY

Step 6:

Water the plant slowly and sparingly. Doing this prevents overwatering and allows the water to flow down the layers. 

Method Two: Using activated charcoal 

Method Two: Using activated charcoal

For this procedure, you will need:

  • A plant pot 
  • Your plant
  • Trowel (optional)
  • Drainage rocks such as marble, perlite, or gravel
  • Soil

Activated charcoal

Activated charcoal absorbs water and destroys odor-causing bacteria. The procedure for this method is similar to using coffee filters. 

Step 1:

Arrange the landscape rocks at the bottom of the pot, layering it about 2-3 inches high using the trowel or placing them with your hands.

Step 2:

Add a layer of activated charcoal above the rocks. Layer it to about 1-2 inches and pat down. The filters will be temporary as they degrade over time. They will help support the soil and roots.

Step 3:

Using the trowel or your hands, add a layer of soil above the filters. Fill it about halfway or until it reaches near the rim of the pot. The amount of soil you use depends on the size of your plant.

Step 4:

Knock out your plant from its old pot and gently pry the root tips apart. Doing this helps establish the plant’s root system.

Step 5:

Firmly place the plant into the pot and layer the remaining spaces with more soil. Push down each layer as you reach the top, making sure the soil is loose enough to let air flow.

Step 6:

Water the plant slowly and sparingly. 

USING A CACHEPOT

A cachepot is a decorative container, usually without drainage holes, that holds a potted plant. It could be a woven basket or a decorative ceramic plant pot. 

For this procedure, you will need:

A plant pot slightly smaller than your plant’s pot with drainage holes 

  • Your plant
  • Draining rocks
  • Trowel (optional)
  • A larger container (can be a decorative ceramic or glass plant pot or woven basket) should be 1 to 2 inches wider in diameter than the smaller plant pot.

Step 1:

Layer the bottom of the larger container with draining rocks using the trowel or your hands. Use enough so that your plant pot sticks out at the top. Doing this increases the airflow of the plant by raising it above the bottom where water can pool.

Step 2:

Move your plant from its original pot to the pot with drainage holes. Fill it with soil.

Step 3:

Place the smaller pot into the larger container without drainage holes. Do not fill the space in the decorative pot with soil.

Step 4:

Water the plant slowly and sparingly to allow the water to flow down properly.

Step 5:

Enjoy your plant! 

Conclusion

Now we have over two methods for potting plants without drainage holes. 

Remember to enjoy the planting process and keep nurturing your plant! Also, make sure you don’t overwater your plant or keep it in the rain, or the water will eventually kill your plant.

Do you have more ideas? You can get plant pots here.

References:

Pistils Nursery. How to Plant In a Pot without Drainage Holes. [https://pistilsnursery.com/blogs/journal/how-to-plant-in-a-pot-without-drainage-holes]. Accessed October 8th, 2020.

Magnolia. How to pot A Plant without Drainage Holes. [https://magnolia.com/how-to-pot-a-plant-without-drainage-holes]. Accessed October 8th 2020.

Ambius. The Ultimate Guide to Indoor Plants. [https://www.ambius.com/blog/the-ultimate-guide-to-indoor-plants/#how-do-you-plant-indoor-plants]. Accessed October 8th, 2020.

Apartment Therapy. How to Care For Plants with Pots without Drainage Holes. [https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/plant-care-pots-without-drainage-hole-258752]. Accessed October 8th 2020.

By Brittany Goldwyn. Creating Drainage In Planters Without Holes. Accessed 8th October 2020.